Monday, November 11, 2019

You Need This to Be Happier and More Successful at Work



More employers are beginning to focus on "emotional intelligence" when making new hires and when deciding who is ready to be promoted.

Emotional intelligence is often described as an ability to be empathetic to others, to understand their emotions -- and your own emotions -- and how to best deal with them in the workplace.

But emotional intelligence isn't easy for everyone, and some may believe that when they need it they can just Google it and figure it out. But it's more complex than that, and without some commitment of time and energy, your efforts are going to fall flat.

If you want to be successful in today's workplace, then you need to embrace emotional intelligence and understand how it will not only make you a better employee or leader, but also improve other aspects of your life. Once you tune into people emotions -- and your own feelings -- then you will make better decisions, reduce your stress and be more successful.

In a new book, "Emotional Intelligence (You Can Really Use)" author Kerry Goyette explores several issues, including how trying to survive office politics "tempts us to defensively guard our reputation at all costs."

How so? By wearing "ego armor" that we believe protects us. We detect a threat, and since we only have seconds to react, we react with conflict avoidance; impulsiveness; blame-shifting; control; perfectionism; or power hunger. Such reactions help us feed our need for immediate gratification or to mask our insecurities. But they're rooted in fear and we can overcome them to make better decisions, she says.

One suggestion: Sit down and write about what you will do when one of the above issues pops up. When you want to shift blame, what will you do instead? When you go into avoidance mode, what will you do to counteract it?

"The earlier you recognize an emotion, the more choice you will have in dealing with it," says Dr. Paul Ekman, a deception detection expert  in Goyette's book. "In Buddhist terms, it's recognizing the spark before the flame. In Western terms, it's trying to increase the gap between impulse and saying or doing something you might regret later."



Monday, November 4, 2019

Is Your Job About to Become Obsolete?



Trade wars. Labor strikes. The rise of automation.
Those are the things that are most worrisome for the U.S. economy and the employment outlook, along with the decline in manufacturing, retail and government jobs. But before panic sets in, it’s important to note that there are plenty of bright spots in the job picture, especially heading into the next six months.
“I'm very optimistic about the economy and jobs,” says Tom Gimbel, CEO of the LaSalle Network in Chicago, a staffing and recruiting firm.
Experts like Gimbel are upbeat because, even though jobless claims have inched up at times this year, and various sectors (agriculture, manufacturing) are being affected by trade disruptions, there are no indications that a recession is (read more here)

Monday, October 28, 2019

Help Your Career by Learning the Art of Persuasion



Have you ever tried to persuade someone to do something at work -- give you a pay raise, let you take on a new project, adopt a new system -- and you fail miserably?

There's a reason for your lack of success. The technical term is called "reactance," which in layman's terms means: "The harder you push, the less someone else will want to do what you want."

That's a pretty key understanding of human nature if you want to be successful in your career. There are always going to be times when you're trying to persuade someone of something, from the small ("Can you wait on customers while I run to the restroom?") to the large ("Can I take the next six weeks to work exclusively on this new idea I have?")

New research sheds some light on effective persuasion techniques. One of the keys is that too many people rely on emails or texts when they're communicating, and that lacks persuasive power. Instead, talk to someone in person, or on the phone if that's not possible.

Also, think about the words you will use when persuading someone. You need to choose words carefully and not overuse certain ones in every situation or you end up sounding like an infomercial. For example, "you" is an important word, humanizing your connection to the other person. Other powerful words of persuasion include "free," "because," "instantly" and "new."

Next time you want to persuade someone at work, don't just try and wing it. Think about your goal, the best time to approach someone (not when they're under great stress or deadline), keeping your voice modulated and using words that persuade.





Monday, October 21, 2019

How to Impress a Company So You Get Hired


Job seekers currently looking for their full-time dream job may find the road to success begins by landing one of the hundreds of thousands of seasonal jobs available this holiday season.
That’s because many employers consider seasonal work an informal trial run of potential permanent hires, and the smartest seasonal workers will be prepared to make an impression. Since the hiring criteria for seasonal workers is often much less rigorous than for permanent hires, it gives more people a chance to get a foot in the door.
“Many people who can’t get a full-time job say they just need to be able to show employers what they can do, but they can’t get an interview or maybe they don’t interview well,” says Lisa Rangel, CEO of Chameleon Resumes and Job Landing Academy. “So, the seasonal job becomes a working interview.”
That’s an advantage for those (read more here)

Monday, October 14, 2019

Need a Seasonal Gig? These May Be Just What You Want



Last year was a blockbuster holiday season for retailers, but threats of trade wars and a volatile stock market may put a damper on consumer spending and that could translate into less seasonal hiring this year, one labor expert says.
"It's hard to say if 2019 will be as giving as last year," says Alan Benson, an assistant professor in the work and organizations group at the University of Minnesota. "Last year, retailers hired for some 700,000 seasonal job openings. That's a big chunk of the labor force. A good season is enough to move the needle (read more here)

Monday, October 7, 2019

Here are Some Great Part-Time Gigs for College Students



Decades ago, it wasn’t unusual to find college students earning extra money waiting tables or working at the local mall while on holiday breaks from school. Coeds still occupy these types of jobs, but today the options are more extensive — allowing students to work schedules that better fit their needs, or commute no farther than their dorm rooms thanks to laptops and the internet.
“The tech savvy-ness of college students sets them up nicely to handle some interesting jobs, like remote jobs, for example,” says Brie Reynolds, career development manager and coach at FlexJobs, a job search and advice site. “"Some of the part-time remote jobs we’ve seen posted frequently include (see more here)

Monday, September 30, 2019

Study Reveals the Havoc Caused by Liars and Cheats



It may start one day with a bit of deception on your part.

You're late getting a report done, so you plagiarize some obscure white paper so that you can turn it in on time, but never mention the work is not entirely yours. Or, perhaps you make a mistake, but instead of admitting you screwed up, you blame a summer intern who has returned to school for the semester.

You may not think much about such lies. After all, the person who wrote the white paper is dead and no one really liked that intern anyway. So, no harm, no foul.

But a new report from the University of Michigan Ross School of Business, Washington University, the University of Virginia and Harvard University finds that once someone becomes dishonest, then they no longer are as accurate about reading the emotions of other people.

That may sound fairly benign, until you consider the growing importance of emotional intelligence in the workplace and how more employers believe it's critical to long-term success.

In the study, researchers say they discovered that after cheating once, it not only reduced someone's ability to read emotions, but it also made it more likely that the person would cheat again.

One of the most worrisome findings to me was that researchers say that once you start down that slippery slope of being dishonest, then you start to "dehumanize" others and that fuels negative biases against those outside your group. For workplaces trying to be more inclusive, that should be a huge red flag.