Thursday, July 16, 2009

How to Quit a Job Properly


No one talks much these days about quitting a job. After all, with an unemployment rate heading towards 10 percent, most of the focus has been on how to get a job and keep a job.

Still, you know that if a great opportunity came along, you might jump at it. It could be because it offered more money, but it also might be because you felt it gives you a chance to do something you feel passionate about, or perhaps because you feel it's a more stable position. Whatever the reason, it's more important than ever that you make sure you make a stellar exit.

Keep in mind that how you leave a position is often how you are remembered most by colleagues and your boss. And, as we all know, the world is often a small one – so quitting a job poorly may come back to haunt you for years to come, perhaps even adversely affecting other job opportunities. This lesson, unfortunately, is one that many people in this job market have not come to understand until it's too late.

So, how do you leave a job properly and make such a good impression on co-workers and the boss that they will have nothing but positive things to say about you? You need to:

• Prepare. Before you tell the boss, understand your company’s policy about employees who quit. Some require you to be removed immediately. If this is the case, make sure you have all your personal files removed from your computer and have cleared away any questionable material from your desk.
• Make it legal. Your resignation letter to your boss should be professional (no sarcasm, hateful comments, etc.) and state clearly your intentions. Include: the date the letter is written, your official last day (two weeks is the common courtesy) and your legal name, along with your signature. This is the letter that will go in your personnel file so there’s no need to be long-winded. If you can’t think of anything nice to say, think Richard Nixon. He resigned in just seven words, but we all got the point quite clearly.
• Practice. Rehearse what you plan to say to co-workers and the boss when you decide to quit. Make sure you don’t make any disparaging comments about the business, or say something like how “not working with such losers anymore will be so nice.” Also, don’t offer too much information about your future plans, since it’s not good form to talk about all the exciting opportunities that await you and how you’re going to be making loads of money and working with great people, blah, blah, blah. None of that helps your boss or your co-workers, and just makes them sort of, well, hate you.
• Be a pro until the end. Don’t start slacking off on your duties. In fact, you might have to put in some extra time getting files in order; briefing others where you stand on projects; informing your customers who to contact after you leave; leaving notes on where to find information that will be needed; and meeting with the boss to let him know you’re trying to dot all the i’s and cross all the t’s before you leave. And, for goodness’ sake, don’t take your departure as a sign to start loading up the backpack with goodies from the supply cabinet. Be absolutely sure you don’t take anything that doesn’t belong to you, not even a pencil. Check at home to make sure you don’t have any company property, and if you do, return it promptly.
• Exit gracefully. If you have an exit interview, don’t use it as a chance to vent any hard feelings. Again, this will get back to the boss, and sink your reputation in his eyes and in others. Remember, bosses talk to other bosses, and human resource people talk to other human resource people. Being seen as difficult and vengeful and taking potshots on your way out the door will not help your career. Also, remember that if you criticize a co-worker today, that same person may just turn out to be a future boss tomorrow. Leaving with a firm handshake and a smile will serve you well in the long run.


What are some other ways to make sure your exit is a professional one?

4 comments:

Scot Herrick said...

Another important task is to ensure you have the personal e-mail and cell phone numbers of the people you want to stay in touch with before you leave.

The points in this article -- making sure you are quitting in a professional manner -- are critically important because the next position you get will likely happen because of the people you are working with right now who are part of your business network.

Anita said...

Scot,
Great suggestion. I think once you decide to quit, your focus becomes the new job, and that's how you let details like this get by you. But people at your "old" job are going to be watching you closely, and seeing if you care enough to not only do a great job in your remaining time, but if you will still treat them professionally.

Fibo said...

Now is probably the time to get/ give recommendations on Linked-In with your boss or colleagues.
If possible!

Andre said...

Cool... I also found some other great pointers on how to quit http://howtohacklife101.blogspot.com/2011/08/how-to-quit-your-job.html